Posts Tagged ‘Heath Ledger’

The Cognitive Dissonance of Batman’s Dilemma or Why did it end that way? **Major Spoiler’s Included**

July 26, 2008
What to be or what not to be...a split identity.

What to be or what not to be...a split identity.

Below is a comment/question from a reader about Batman:The Dark Knight, one that a few people have asked me, so I imagine it will be on the minds of many more people, and so it should probably be addressed with an article unto itself. Watching the film again you’ll notice that everything dealing with Bruce Wayne throughout the film leads to what we’re about to talk about. While my answer may not be sufficient for some, it will give you something to chew on. ***And yes there are spoilers that give away the end of the film included in this post!!!*** If you want to read my spoiler free review go here. But avoid reading the comments at that post because this question is included.

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“Batman: The Dark Knight”

July 22, 2008
There's a little Alex in all of us...even The Joker.

There's a little Alex in all of us...even The Joker.

There’s a lot of talk these days about Heath Ledger’s performance as The Joker in Batman: The Dark Knight, and while it’s certainly deserving it’s only one part of the masterpiece that is director Christopher Nolan’s newest installment in the Batman Franchise. To say that the film’s a piece of something beyond it’s scope almost diminishes it, because as a singular whole there’s so much right about this film, there’s actually nothing at all wrong with it. But even to say that is doing it a disservice.

To start at the beginning. This is the the best plotted and written script (written by both Christopher and his brother Jonathon Nolan) I’ve seen since North by Northwest and Chinatown. In every scene there is conflict. Every character, major or minor, has to make a decision based on what they think is right and they are forced to live with the decisions they make. And those decisions not only further the story but add emotional depth to everyone’s character. Do you know how difficult that is to do in a movie? And the brothers make it look easy.

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Summer Trailers and their Marketing Plans – No more surprises for Batman.

May 27, 2008

***Normally an image would be here, but so as not to spoil anything, I have refrained from showing too much.***

How else to do a raspberry in the title of an article without doing a smiley? Hate it. I’ll sue myself!

It was inevitable that no matter how long I kept my eyes closed during the trailers of the new Batman film I was going to see what the Joker looked like. 2 images spread across the internet like wild fire. Okay, fine. I can live with it.

But that’s it. Even though I’m beginning to feel left out, I continue to close my eyes. I want to retain that feeling when I was a kid, when every movie was a surprise. When they were smart enough not to throw a visual from every scene of a movie at the audience in a trailer.

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Heath Ledger; 28

January 22, 2008

Heath LedgerSeparating a talent from a person can be difficult. Some of the greatest actors have remained a mystery to the public over the years because you can never pin point with accuracy their true character. In recent years however it’s become a lot easier, if not exactly getting to know movie stars, then finding out about intimate details of their lives – true and otherwise. The influx of information from television, radio, magazines and the internet is almost paralyzing. All of the news reports concerning stars opens up the imagination as to who a person could be. But that’s what it is, postulating. Those that have seen his romantic endeavors on film will wonder why such a sweet individual with everything to lose would do this, those that have followed his dramatic career will see him as a complicated  and ultimately lonely individual. It’s all inference.

In an article in the New York Post they describe that the room he was found in was filled with strewn about sleeping pills. A careless and unnecessary detail that plays more with our imagination than states a fact about his death. They are obviously looking for drama, as they also are when they write:

Ledger’s love life earned him as many headlines as his acting career.

This is an incredibly worthless cliche to throw at anyone who was as talented as Ledger. An attractive man working in an industry with other notable attractive women will obviously date some of them, maybe even marry a few. You don’t expect people in relatively similar communities or environments not to. And that’s the problem with reporting today, who cares who he was dating. People date. Save comments like that for the ones that aren’t worth their time on the screen. Since seeing Ledger in A Knight’s Tale, I knew he would be an actor worth watching, and he has been. (more…)

“I’m Not There”: An Artist as Landscape

December 5, 2007

I’m Not There

I don’t really like talking about my films. Everything I want to say is in the film itself; for me to say anything more is, as the proverb goes, like “drawing legs on a picture of snake.” But from time to time and idea I thought I had conveyed in the film does not seem to have been generally understood. On those occasions I do feel an urge to talk about my work. Nevertheless, I try not to. If what I have said in my film is true, someone will understand.’ – Akira Kurosawa

None of the characters are called Bob Dylan in Todd Haynes’s bio of the eccentric artist I’m Not There, which is fine since we’re not dealing with absolutes. I’ve grown weary over the years of bios dealing with the same old things (since Chaplin for goodness sake): who they were sleeping with, what drugs they did, how it all influenced their … yawn! Haynes avoids many of these cliches, partly through non-linear storytelling much like the wonderful film La Vie en Rose did earlier this year, but also by creating the most complex and realistic interpretation of not only an artist but a human being I’ve seen in a long time. It plays almost as a hate letter in response to those who try to put artists and people in simple to understand boxes. That because they are good at something or stand up for something in the world, then that’s all that they are. There’s a devastating moment in the film in which a pompous British interviewer an unnamed character (so proclaims the blank space on imdb.com) played by Bruce Greenwood who in searching for his idea of what truth is uncovers Dylan’s origins and the room falls silent as the mystery behind this artist begins to crumble. Doesn’t the interviewer realize that a person is more than where they’ve come from or more than the style of music that has influenced them or that they’ve influenced. Don’t Dylan’s fans realize that in order to thrive as an artist, the artist has to change! They have to work against the pull of society and who they are as a person. Artists’ have to challenge themselves and what they believe.

In this film Dylan seems to be just as much in search of who he is as Haynes is searching out who Dylan is, but unlike the Brit Interviewer he gives us more than one truth.

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