Posts Tagged ‘Movie Review’

How to Train Your Dragon

March 31, 2010

Rousing. Like ET in some ways.

I rose from my seat, slow, deliberate. I moved outside, my head in a fog and can hardly remember my walk from the theatre to the train station, except for seeing a billboard high above the Hollywood city streets with a young man riding atop a dragon as they burst through a circle of fire with the title scrawled above it How to Train Your Dragon.

It’s true. I have an affinity for fantasy, but a very grounded fantasy. Rules have to exist as do emotions. Simply because you carry a sword and wear a loin cloth doesn’t mean I’m automatically going to love you. In fact, I love fantasy so much, it has to work even harder to impress me. I feel that I can continue now with this review with absolute sincerity.

(more…)

Hamlet 2: The Christ of Art

September 11, 2008
What art is made of.

What would you do for your art?

Dana Marschz is pronounced Marsch-z (the “z” an additional emphasis beyond the “sch”) and is one of a number of things that makes the main character of Hamlet 2 that much more awkward and potentially tragic. As he even whines, “My life is a parody of a tragedy”. In fact the position Dana finds himself in is a pretty common tale for those that come to Los Angeles looking to become an actor. Their pride is stripped from them completely and they become emotionally erratic and completely insecure individuals…sometimes they never regain that composure because they don’t know how to refocus their creative and scarred sides into something healthy.

And so we follow Dana on his personal odyssey as he seeks to regain his inner strength and voice by creating an original work for a group of high school students. And quite an odyssey it is. Pam Brady (a South Park writer alum and Team America: World Police scribe) along with Andrew Fleming (the director of a nice little gem Dick and other lesser films) have created a concoction and character that’s so awkward that it’s hilarious, but then it stops being funny and becomes so very, incredibly awkward that it becomes honest. It’s like staring at a freshly opened wound.

(more…)

“Street Kings”

May 5, 2008

Street Kings

David Ayer’s (Harsh Times, Training Day) new film Street Kings starring Keanu Reeves opened about a month ago and is pretty much gone from the cineplexes.

Why? Because it wasn’t a great film, but it wasn’t a bad film. It wasn’t a film that shouted for me to write about it after I had seen it, just to get around to it when I had the time. So here I am. I’m sure you can feel the enthusiasm.

Certainly it was a mediocre film, but not because of Keanu Reeves. People like to throttle him with less than flattering descriptions…”wooden” is one that comes to mind. I don’t think Keanu is wooden. And I don’t think he was the worst thing in this film.

(more…)

“Stop-Loss”

April 5, 2008

Stop-Loss

Can a person dislike a movie that has it’s heart in exactly the right place? I’m so middle ground with Kimberly Pierce’s Stop-Loss that I can’t say that I hated it, but I can’t say I loved it. And since the movie is almost like a patchwork quilt of scenes sewn together, sometimes awkwardly and without the logic and flow of a story or theme, I ended up loving parts and then watching the wall of the theatre during other parts. Really, watching the wall.

The film follows a lot of the best of the best as they finish their tours in Iraq and find out that fitting in at home is near impossible. Home being Texas, and they don’t hold back in letting you know that these are good ol’ boys. The leader of this handsome bunch is Brandon King, played by an adequate Ryan Phillippe, who finds out that his tour isn’t done. He’s been Stop-Lossed. Basically this is a way for the government to get their trained soldiers back into the line of fire during a time of war because army recruits aren’t signing up like they used to. Only…the war is over. How can they get away with this? By not drawing attention to it.

(more…)

“Gone Baby Gone”; the Afflecks’ love child

October 25, 2007

gone baby gone

The thing that sticks with you the most in Gone Baby Gone isn’t just how good the movie is, but how the movie ends. In a matter of five minutes and one scene you can tell how the the main character’s life will turn out in regards to the character he’s left with. The main character I speak of is Private Detective Patrick Kenzie played with brooding naivety one second and a calm anger with a peppering of necessary violence the next by the wonder boy of the year Casey Affleck. Casey plays the last moments of the scene as someone who realizes that while every one else might have been correct, he was still right, and he will have to give the rest of his life to make it work. I know that’s incredibly vague, but hopefully it will spark enough interest in the few readers that read this to want to go see the film. The final shot in itself is so quietly moving it’s worth the 11 to 14 dollars admission. (more…)

“The Darjeeling Limited”, Wes’ newest

October 8, 2007

darjeeling limited

I loved Wes Anderson’s Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou. It was an adventure that a kid might have imagined. What kid doesn’t imagine finding a rare shark at the bottom of the ocean. It was a dream that reminded me of the children’s book Where the Wild Things Are. It’s too bad Spike Jonze is directing it, because Anderson would be the perfect fit. The dry absurdity he bring to his movies sits well with my own personality. And that sharp humor is put to good use in The Darjeeling Limited, a story about two brothers coerced together by their eldest third to reconnect as family and spiritually on a trip through India. The brothers are played respectively and wonderfully by Owen Wilson, as the eldest who after a near death experience brings them together. The middle child by Adrien Brody, who seems to be most affected by the emotional trauma that split them apart. And the youngest by Jason Schwartzman, a novelist who’s too afraid to admit that his books are based on real events. It’s good that Anderson writes movies about wealthy people, because they can go anywhere they wish at any time they wish allowing for a far more expansive journey. Here though the money isn’t the cause of their inner turmoils.

(more…)


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.