Posts Tagged ‘Movies’

“My Blueberry Nights”: An Odyssey of Great Portions

April 14, 2008

My Blueberry Nights

Wong Kar-Wai can make anything look sensual. In all my life I’ve never seen a blueberry pie that made me want to kiss someone, but the way he shoots the ice cream melting down the sides of a mound of blueberries is so romantic you want to go out, find a girl and spend the rest of your life with her and that’s in the first five minutes.

In his new film, My Blueberry Nights, that romantic feeling is unloosed upon the audience. It however begins to wear after awhile before coming back to a redeeming final few minutes of sumptuous filmmaking.

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More Websites: You Mean I Can Watch Everything On-Line?

April 3, 2008

Browsing through the list of free movies and television shows gave me serious chills just now.What really, free movies and television shows? Did you just say that Uncle Phillip?

Why yes internet fledglings, yes I did.

But what’s the name of the website, Uncle Phillip?

Well, it’s… (more…)

My New Favorite Websites: For the Movie Buff in You

March 25, 2008

My absence from writing blogs will soon be explained along with hopefully some more film reviews and ponderings. Until then I thought I would introduce a few websites to you that are absolutely incredible and perfect for films buffs.

The first feeds two of my fascinations, first with the art form of the movie trailer and second with what has inspired directors to make the movies they do: Trailers from Hell. It’s a website in which filmmakers like Joe Dante, Rick Baker, John Landis, Mick Garris, Edgar Wright and handful more pick the most memorable movie trailers from their past and do a commentary for them. I’m discovering movies that have been lost to the public eye for ages. Some movies I love, like Peter Brook’s Lord of the Flies, some say more about the director than they could say about themselves (check out both of Eli Roth’s picks from the grindhouse exploitation days), others just leave me dumbfounded and wanting more, like Clint Eastwood’s The Beguiled or Invasion U.S.A in which we see that the three main characters were picked specifically because they resembled Bogart, Bergman and Peter Lorre.

It’s really a fun place to kill a few hours and learn about an era of film that I only get a glimpse of when filmmakers now feel some inspiration. You can see the beginnings of films like Slither, Hostel, slasher films and Hynovista! If this website interests you check out my other article: Sam Raimi “Haunted” by his Past…

The other website contains a short film I viewed some time ago and am just getting around to writing about now. It’s a truly remarkable achievement by filmmaker Martin Scorcese. He recreates three pages of a lost Alfred Hitchcock movie as if Hitchcock himself were directing it. The Key to Reserva.

Enjoy and look for more from me soon.

“Rambo”; There’s a Little Bit of Him in Everyone

February 2, 2008
Rambo
When I told my friend I thought Rambo was blissfully unaware he shot back that it was consciously oblivious. They are both accurate. Sylvester Stallone’s new chapter in the “let’s revisit everything that made me famous part of my life” has brought him back to his second most visited character John Rambo. And he’s surlier than ever. Unhappy at work (must not have great health care options for snake catchers in Thailand) he’s given the opportunity to boat a bunch of so single minded it hurts missionaries into Burma so they can help the innocent people who are being slaughtered.
“Do you have guns?” Rambo asks. When Sarah (Julie Benz) the missionary who won’t give up on Rambo says no, Rambo replies “Then you’re not helping anyone.” Why can’t people just leave this man alone!? Eventually she talks him into it. The missionaries get trapped in Burma and Rambo has to come to the rescue, but not alone this time. He has to play second to a group of rowdy mercenaries for a bit. That’s the story.
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Heath Ledger; 28

January 22, 2008

Heath LedgerSeparating a talent from a person can be difficult. Some of the greatest actors have remained a mystery to the public over the years because you can never pin point with accuracy their true character. In recent years however it’s become a lot easier, if not exactly getting to know movie stars, then finding out about intimate details of their lives – true and otherwise. The influx of information from television, radio, magazines and the internet is almost paralyzing. All of the news reports concerning stars opens up the imagination as to who a person could be. But that’s what it is, postulating. Those that have seen his romantic endeavors on film will wonder why such a sweet individual with everything to lose would do this, those that have followed his dramatic career will see him as a complicated¬† and ultimately lonely individual. It’s all inference.

In an article in the New York Post they describe that the room he was found in was filled with strewn about sleeping pills. A careless and unnecessary detail that plays more with our imagination than states a fact about his death. They are obviously looking for drama, as they also are when they write:

Ledger’s love life earned him as many headlines as his acting career.

This is an incredibly worthless cliche to throw at anyone who was as talented as Ledger. An attractive man working in an industry with other notable attractive women will obviously date some of them, maybe even marry a few. You don’t expect people in relatively similar communities or environments not to. And that’s the problem with reporting today, who cares who he was dating. People date. Save comments like that for the ones that aren’t worth their time on the screen. Since seeing Ledger in A Knight’s Tale, I knew he would be an actor worth watching, and he has been. (more…)

“In the Valley of Elah”: The More Things Change…

January 9, 2008

In the Valley of Elah

There’s a great cast of supporting actors in In the Valley of Elah, a film that deserves far more attention than its received. There’s Jason Patric, Josh Brolin, Susan Sarandon and about half the cast from No Country for Old Men. Charlize Theron as Detective Emily Sanders does some of the best work I’ve seen her do (and it’s done without boasting about the paring down of her beauty.)

But the performance that steals the show is Tommy Lee Jones as Hank Deerfield, creating the third best character I’ve seen at the theatres this year (just behind Daniel Plainview and Anton Chigurh.) Hank is a man of simplicity, a man of strong religious values, a military man who continues to live the rituals that were ingrained in his head. The blankets have to be perfectly tucked under the bed, face cleanly shaved to a fault, shoes shined and cleaned…everything he does is by the book. Jones instills such a strong sense of virtue in this former Military Police Officer that it’s easy to love him despite his hard headed nature, and the fact that he sees himself as more capable than those around him.

Hank’s a man who doesn’t believe that his son, also military, would go AWOL, but when the son doesn’t answer phone calls or emails Hank steps out on his own to do some investigating. He hits a road block going the military route and seeks help at the local police station where he meets and butts heads with Det. Sanders. Theron isn’t afraid to play Sanders with the humility of a great actor. Even though she finds Sanders strength in the character’s son and a drive to prove herself among her fellow detectives, she remains far from perfect.

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